chan practice

Interfaith Promoting religious cooperation to bring peace and well-being to humanity If we wish to share our religious faith and concepts with all of humanity, the best way is to practice tolerance, respect, and help those who differ from us. We should apply wisdom and compassion to help settle conflicts and wars waged between various ethnic groups, settling disputes through wisdom and reaching out to different ethnic groups with compassion. We should bring love and method to resolve conflict among religions and discrimination among races, rather than replacing their original faiths with the religion we believe in. If we can base mutual cooperation among religions on the principle of respecting all other religions, then people will be able to coexist peacefully. This is particularly pertinent, living in a modern, global environment with multiple religions. As soon as we set foot outside the borders of our own country, step outside our own ethnic group, or even when we leave our own homes, we will come into contact with people belonging to different religions. In an open society we may even encounter different religious faiths being practiced by spouses and children within one nuclear family. We have to show respect and appreciation in support of each other's choices. We should not subjectively criticize or comment on someone else's religious faith, but instead we must help each other and cooperate to create a harmonious, peaceful, happy, and heart-warming living environment. This so-called cooperation does not necessarily have to operate within one and the same organization. For example, in response to each other we give up violence, cast away past enmity, and cease to settle old scores, but instead work together to put an end to the root causes of hunger, disease, natural disasters, and racial warfare, and to help preserve our environment and the Earth's resources for future generations. In addition we may cooperate in protecting humanit

Although many Buddhist temples are closed and people are asked to stay at home due to the pandemic, the urge to practice never cools down. Here we sincerely provide resources for Chan meditation and learning Buddhism as well as the information of online practice groups. We hope these could help you create an environment to practice at home, with peace in mind. Latest Dharma Talks Development of Chan from the Beginning: [1],[2], [3], [4], [5], [6] The Heart of Chan: Exploring Mind via the Mahaprajna Paramita: [1], [2], [3], [4] Chan 101: [1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7], [8] Lotus Sutra: [1], [2], [3], [4], [5] Causes and Conditions Five Skandhas Twelve Links of Dependent Origination Enlightenment and Buddhahood: Can a dog get enlightened?   Chan Meditation at Home Sitting Meditation alone See the instruction here You may need a meditation timer (see Useful App below)   Sitting Meditation with Others  Check out online regular events, Dharma talks, and courses here!    Moving Meditation  DDM's Eight-Form Moving Meditation incorporates the essence of Chan into exercise. It helps keep our body fit and healthy, harmonize our mind and is an easy way for us to access the wonderfulness of Chan teachings, in developing peace of body and mind. - Eight Form Moving Meditation-Standing Posture  - Eight Form Moving Meditation- Sitting Posture     Useful App Chan Timer  A user-friendly and simple app for Meditation, Prostration practice, and Buddhist Chant. In the Meditation section, there are options for time setting and guidance. Venerable Guo Yuan will lead you to relax your body and mind and guide you to use meditation methods. In the Prostration practice and Buddhist Chant, you can count the time you prostrate or chant.  English, Chinese, and Cantonese versions are provided. It is available for IOS&nbs

Many people regard Chan practice as being only for those who have time to spare. In fact, the busier you are, the more you need Chan practice. Master Sheng Yen once said that the busiest period in life is the most precious period, and also the period of time in which stability of the mind is most needed. Those who are busy have the most need for the concepts and methods of Chan.   When we sit down to meditate, our observation of the mind is sharpened. In stillness, we can practice in accordance with the principles of collecting the mind, concentrating the mind, and calming the mind, as well as become proficient in the methods to reach clarity and relaxation. Then, when we return to our everyday life, it becomes easier to maintain calmness and deal with stresses, conflicts, and difficult emotions that constantly arise. Extending the practice into daily life is one of the main emphases of Chan.   The Importance of Setting Aside Time for Chan Practice   For Chan practitioners, it is not easy to reach and maintain a state of calmness and harmony solely through their daily practice. Due to constant interactions with the external world and the nonstop flux of emotions in our daily life, it is not easy to reach a state of calmness in which the mind is unswayed by the environment. That is why it is important to take part in one or two-day retreats from time to time and to participate in intensive retreats at least once or twice a year. In the span of one's lifetime, it is even necessary to arrange for longer periods of intensive Chan practice retreat.   We come to Chan retreat with a relaxed mindset of going on a vacation. But practicing Chan is not a form of vacationing. In the intensive retreat, we use the method of living and practicing in a group to ease our self-centeredness, and, furthermore, to lessen our vexations. We enter the Chan Hall with the devotion of our full life. We vow to practice with total diligence and concentratio

Although nowadays, many people enjoy a materially abundant life, it often comes at the expense of increased pressure from work, relationships, society, and family, leaving most people overwhelmed. Some degree of stress could, in some circumstances, be a driving force for progress. Nevertheless, both physical and mental health can be seriously affected when one is exposed to great pressure for a long stretch of time. To release pressure, massage, aromatic therapy, soothing bubbles,  the recent trend in so-called "Slow Travel", etc. have become commonplace methods of stress reduction; some hospitals even provide "relaxation clinics" to teach people how to adjust their moods and to relax both physically and mentally, so that they can get recharged to face daily challenges again.   According to  Time magazine, every day, more than ten million people in the US try to relax and reduce their stress by way of practicing meditation. Other means include exercise, listening to music, working out in the gym, painting, yoga, Qigong, etc. In the midst of all these, Chan Meditation has become "mainstream," being studied and practiced all over the world. In fields as diverse as medicine, sports, education, literature, and arts,  people from east and west alike are approaching the ancient Chan practice through different perspectives. In business, employees are encouraged to apply Chan practice in their job and to train their body and mind. It is as though the body and mind could easily get anchored simply by holding onto the idea of "Chan" in work and daily life.   Bodily awareness through relaxation   Modern people are too good at neglecting the signals their body sends to them. It's just like filling up a balloon: only until it bursts do we finally realize that the body is truly too tensed and too exhausted. Becoming aware of bodily sensations is the first step to relaxation. More often than not,

Chan Hall is where meditation retreats take place in a monastry. However, our home becomes a Chan Hall when we meditate at home. To encourage everyone to keep a habit of meditation at home when monstries are closed, Dharma Drum Mountain Meditation Activity Department (法鼓山傳燈院) organized a series of vedios demonstrating a full guidance of meditation. It includes Eight-form Moving Meditation, Guided Exercise prior to sitting, Guided Exercise for Meditation, Stillness and Silence, Massage to conclude the sitting, and a Dharma Talk. We welcome everyone to continue practicing with us and maintain a calm and peaceful mind in everyday life.  (Episode 2 will be released in February of 2021.)   Episode 1: Chan Practice and Immunity

Chan Hall is where meditation retreats take place in a monastry. However, our home becomes a Chan Hall when we meditate at home. To encourage everyone to keep a habit of meditation at home when monstries are closed, Dharma Drum Mountain Meditation Activity Department (法鼓山傳燈院) organized a series of vedios demonstrating a full guidance of meditation. It includes Eight-form Moving Meditation, Guided Exercise prior to sitting, Guided Exercise for Meditation, Stillness and Silence, Massage to conclude the sitting, and a Dharma Talk. We welcome everyone to continue practicing with us and maintain a calm and peaceful mind in everyday life.     Episode 2: The Steps of Chan Practice

  We are vexed most by the enemy within – our own minds. Our thoughts, feelings, attitudes and perceptions change constantly. We can move from arrogance to regret, from joy to sorrow, from hate to love, in a matter of seconds. As time passes, our point of view changes, so that we look at something old in an entirely new way. But when we are caught in turmoil of thought and feeling, we feel conflicted and powerless to make decisions. We worry about gain or loss, right or wrong. So much indecision throws us into a tumultuous, vexed state of mind. And though everyone suffers in this way, many people insist that they have no problems. Some even throw tantrums and work themselves into frenzies in their attempts to prove to you that their troubles have nothing to do with them.   “It's not me!” I once asked someone directly why he had so many vexations. “It's not me!” he cried, “It’s the other rotten people who are making me so miserable. “ In fact, most his problems were self-created.   Chose Not to Take Part in Recently, I was riding in a car with four people who were involved in a heated discussion. One said to me, “Sorry that we argue so much, Shi-Fu.” I replied, “You're the ones arguing; it's none of my business. “ I heard what they said, but chose not to take part in or be affected by their conversation. The following morning, one of the four said, “I cannot stand to hear people argue. The very sound of it upsets me. “Do you understand? His vexation stems from his own intolerance.     Analyze the Nature of Your Vexation According to Buddhism, mental vexation can come in the form of greed, anger, ignorance, arrogance, or doubt. Whenever you are distressed, analyze the nature of your vexation. As soon as you determine which category your vexation falls into and reflect on it, the intensity of your ve