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June 28 – 30, 2018: the DDM Sheng Yen Education Foundation (聖嚴教育基金會) held the 7th Chinese Buddhism and Sheng Yen International Conference at the GIS NTU Convention Center. In his opening speech, Venerable Guo Dong (果東法師), Former Abbot President of DDM, stated that the initial aspiration of Master Sheng Yen was to introduce the Buddha Dharma to the modern society so that the general public could benefit from the Dharma; which is also the aim of this conference.
In their macro-analysis, the first keynote speeches in the 7th Chinese Buddhism & Sheng Yen International Conference portrayed ancient literati monks as the significant figures that kept in contact with the society and political authorities, so as to blend in Buddha Dharma with the public.

Furthermore, the second speaker explored the beliefs and practices behind the monks’ endeavors of Dharma dissemination. At last, turning to the micro-analysis, through the studies of monks’ autobiographies writing, the third speaker then revealed their personal body- mind experiences in their life. In the long range impact, intrinsic strength within the ancient monks was deliberately shown thereof.
For your kind reference, as Nung Chan Monastery is holding the Seven-Day Foundation Chan Retreat, from September 29 to Oct 6, 2018, the Campus will NOT be open to the general public within the above duration.

Do Buddhists Believe That Repentance Is Effective? Yes, Buddhists definitely believe in the effectiveness of repentance. While completed acts of killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, and major deception (falsely claiming that one is a noble one) will definitely bring about retribution for the perpetrator, other misdeeds, such as attempted offences, unintentional breaking of the precepts, and failures to follow the rules of dignified conduct [for monastics] can all be repented with all retribution dissolved in accordance with the methods prescribed by the Buddha.
The succession ceremony of the sixth Abbot President of Dharma Drum Mountain will be broadcast LIVE, 9.00 A.M. Sept 2, 2018. (Taipei Time)

On July 3-5, 2018, Gilbert Gutierrez, one of the western dharma heirs from Master Sheng Yen, visited Baoyun Monastery in Taichuang (台中寶雲寺), Nung Chan Monastery in Beitou (北投農禪寺) and gave guidance on meditation and a dharma talk in the morning of July 7 at IMG, International Meditation Group (國際禪坐會).

Next, Gilbert moved on to DDM World Center for Buddhist Education and shared his experiences in Chan methods and practices.
July 17, 2018 at 9:00 am marked the start of Youth Chan Camp; at the invitation of the International Rotary Club, 30 youngsters aged between 18-25 from 15 countries, namely the Czech Republic, India, Germany, Spain, Mexico, Romania, Thailand, U.S.A., England, Italy, Belgium, Slovakia etc., gathered at the DDM World Center for Buddhist Education and Great Wisdom Hall of the Dharma Drum Institute of Liberal Arts to experience complete relaxation of the body and mind through purified encounters at this one-day Chan retreat.
By ceasing bad acts and doing good deeds, our mind will be at peace; Let's join the repentuance ritual, and make up for our mistakes with courage!
In a fast changing world, how can societies in the west and east invite collective insight by drawing on Buddhist wisdom, to map out a blueprint for Buddhist practice in the global community? To mark the imminent 70th anniversary of Humanity Magazine and commemorate the upcoming 10th anniversary of Master Sheng Yen’s passing in 2019, Humanity Magazine, Dharma Drum Corporation, DDM Public Buddhist Education Center, and Sheng Yen Education Foundation co-organized a Global Buddhist Community Symposium at the GIS NTU Convention Center on June 27, 2018. The symposium invited delegates from Buddhist sanghas, Buddhist publishers, and scholars across the globe to have a dialogue. Special guests and over 600 people attended the meeting.
In the age of multi-media and rapid changes, how does Buddhist publishing, as one important sector of Buddhism culture, proactively respond to society’s needs?
As the number of readers diminishes, how do we expand and deepen Buddhism cultural endeavors? What are the responses from specialized Buddhism publishers of the east and west, the authors, and the academics?

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