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Interview with Bhikkhu Bodhi-Part III
Question:
Sutra translation and sutra study play a key role for Buddhism to take roots in the adopted culture, but most Buddhist practitioners in the US don’t actually read and study sutras. What can be done in this regard? In the context of various cultural systems, how can Buddhist ideas be translated and transmitted in their true sense?




Saturday November 4th patrons of Dharma Drum Vancouver Centre were blessed to hear a dharma talk from Abbot President Venerable Guo Dong. The turnout was amazing, with chairs spilling out into the lobby and the dining hall at the back. The subject of the talk was a timely one, something that everyone could relate to, namely, how to communicate and get along across generational and cultural lines.
Interview with Bhikkhu Bodhi-Part II:
Questions:
Lay Buddhism has become quite popular in the west.
As a monastic practitioner, how do you look at lay sanghas as opposed to monastic sanghas?
What are their respective features and restrictions?
Is lay Buddhism going to be a dominant form of Buddhist practice in the west?
Bhikkhu Bodhi was born in 1944, in New York, and obtained a PhD in philosophy, and received full ordination in Sri Lanka. In 1984, he was appointed as the second president of the Buddhist Publication Society, with a distinguished reputation in writing, translating, and editing.

His Renowned publications included The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha -- A Translation of the Majjhima Nikaya 《中部尼柯耶英譯》, The Connected Discourses of the Buddha -- A New Translation of the Samyutta Nikaya 《相應部尼柯耶英譯》, and Numerical Discourses of the Buddha --A Complete Translation of the Anguttara Nikaya 《增支部尼柯耶英譯》.

Through his commentaries on Pali Sutra and Treatises, he is becoming a key figure, propagating Pali Canon of the Theravada school to the West.

Part One: Memories with Dharma Drum Mountain (DDM)

Hugo is a psycholocial counsellor from Mainland China to study Counselling at NTNU. He was introduced by a western freind to come to International Meditation Group (IMG) to practice Chan Meditation and to get more connections with DDM. He had something to share on his experience during the past few years.
New Establishment in Vancouver Chan Meditation Centre

Dharma Drum Vancouver Centre announces its new establishment in Vancouver, the Vancouver Chan Meditation Centre, which opened its doors on March 8.

It had been my wish to attend a Chan retreat lasting more than 3 days for a long time. Finally, the moon, the stars, the sun and everything else in my life lined up perfectly. I was able to carve out some time and fly to Vancouver for the 5-day Outdoor Retreat. Here I will share some impressions of my experience from the retreat on Hornby Island from 9/10 - 9/14.



On Sunday, February 18, 2018, Dharma Drum Vancouver Centre (DDVC) hosted a Chinese New Year Festival open house. This is the fourth year that we have celebrated this event. This celebration, which is carried out in English, is intended to give all of our neighbours from the mainstream Canadian community a chance to learn about Chinese culture and Chan teachings in a fun and welcoming atmosphere.
“I think the AC in the van stopped working.”
“It’s not field work unless the AC goes out.”


Mosquitos, sprained ankles, a car tire slipping off the edge of the road, and AC blowing out in the muggy Northern Taiwan climate are all part of a day’s work in the field. Over one hundred religious sites visited, and one week to go. During the Space and Cyberspace Workshop at DILA, three teams were tasked with recording pictures, video, and location data to create a special database of religious sites in the Jinshan and Shimen districts of Northern Taiwan. Faculty and student researchers from thirteen universities worldwide gathered at Dharma Drum Mountain from June 5th to June 16th to learn digital mapping techniques that will help them in a host of digital humanities projects. This workshop is at the cutting edge of research and combines real world field data with interactive mapping technology, bringing innovation to time honored techniques.
Chinese Chan Buddhism blossoms discreetly


From Editors:
Former Swiss pediatrician, Hildi Thalmann, deeply felt the anguish of this transient life, and turned to Chan meditation. In 2004, after participating in Chan meditation guided by Master Sheng Yen, she took refuge in the Three Jewels under the Master; aspiring to disseminate Dharma Drum Lineage of Chan Buddhism as taught by Master Sheng Yen in her motherland. She then founded the Chan Bern Center for Meditation, promoting a four-year educational curriculum. Through translating Master Sheng Yen's literatures and giving lessons, Thalmann's top priority was to help more people obtain correct guidance in Chan practice.
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