Chan Garden

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From May 1st through the 3rd, 1998, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama and Venerable Chan Master Sheng Yen presented In the Spirit of Manjushri: the Wisdom Teachings of Buddhism at the Roseland in New York. Sponsored by Tibet House New York and the Dharma Drum Mountain Buddhist Association, this event drew some 2,500 people from all Buddhist traditions, as well as scholars of medicine, psychology, education, and comparative religion from around the world.
I have a friend whose relative was heavily in debt and escaped overseas. My friend stayed in Taiwan. However, because he cosigned with his relative in financial dealings, the debt-holder confiscated all his savings and family belongings. My friend was also barred from leaving the country. Because his company and house were taken away, he had to work for somebody else. But every time my friend found employment, the debt-holder would find out where he was working and made him use his salary to pay his debts.
by Chan Master Sheng-yen

"...ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS KEEP GOING, KEEP GOING..."
"...WHEN PEOPLE COME TO ME AND SAY THAT I HAVE A LOT OF WISDOM, IT MAKES ME VERY ASHAMED..."
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Chan exists universally and eternally. There is no need for any teacher to transmit it; what is transmitted is just the method by which one can personally experience Chan. In China, the Chan school developed from Indian Dhyana Buddhism, which taught methods of meditative concentration aimed at the attainment of an absorbed, concentrated state of mind. This school later spread to other countries from China, and is called Zen in Japan, Son in Korea, and Thien in Vietnam.

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Buddhism values our intelligence and our own choices in life. It encourages us to cultivate wisdom and compassion to the fullest extent and to be responsible for all our actions. This attitude not only applies to how we approach Buddhism and the world, but to our own relationship to its traditions, practices, and rituals.
There is a saying in Mahayana Buddhism: "Those who have precepts to break are bodhisattvas; those who have no precepts to break are outer-path followers." Many Buddhists know that receiving the bodhisattva precepts generates great merit, yet they believe this without a real understanding of the profound meaning of the precepts, or of what keeping these precepts entails.
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